In the middle of the tulip season, Dutch horticulturalists are forced to destroy their production every day. An unprecedented situation caused by the pandemic of the new coronavirus which has reduced demand.

In the middle of the tulip season, Dutch horticulturalists are forced to destroy their production every day. An unprecedented situation caused by the pandemic of the new coronavirus which has reduced demand.

(.) – Huge piles of tulips, roses, chrysanthemums and other plants have been lining up for a week in the largest flower market in the world, forced to get rid of a majority of its production in the face of a mountain of unsold goods. “The only solution is to destroy them,” regrets Michel van Schie, spokesperson for the Royal FloraHolland cooperative, the Dutch giant in horticulture. “The flower market in the Netherlands has been around for over 100 years, and this is the first time we have faced such a crisis,” he says.

Royal FloraHolland estimates that “70 to 80% of the total production (of flowers) is being destroyed” in the Netherlands; Dutch producers using the same solution in their own nurseries. The closure of markets and businesses, as well as the ordered containment of the population in several European countries, have “dramatic” consequences for the Dutch horticultural sector, deplores Prisca Kleijn, director of the Royal Bulb Producers Association (KAVB ).

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

On the largest flower market in the world, at FloraHolland Naaldwijk in Honselersdijk, sales and prices have fallen so much that Dutch producers are forced to throw away their production.

Photo: .

“We have Mother’s Day coming and the tulip producers start the harvest in January, until April-May. So it’s in the middle of the season, when they have to earn their money, ”says Prisca Kleijn. According to her, this health crisis falls “at the worst time of the year” for tulip producers in the country. The KAVB tries by all means to help the horticulturalists to sell a maximum of their production, in particular by encouraging the consumers “to buy flowers, not toilet paper”.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here